July 01, 2019

Here at MOMA Solar, we’re always trying to push the boundaries of innovation. Today, we are proud to announce that we have achieved exactly that.

If you haven’t already, meet the MOMA Solar Pop Up Street Light

 

No Cables, No Noise, No Cranes, No Pollution, No Hassles

 

At the beginning of 2019 we set out to create the MOMA Solar Pop Up Street Light with the intention of filling what we saw to be a rather large gap in the market.

Around this time we were tasked with providing a mine site with portable solar lighting needs - specifically to be made out of concrete. It was soon discovered that this was no small feat. The logistics involved in requiring heavy lifting equipment, i.e. a crane and truck, to move a single unit resulted in it being hardly portable - and much less affordable.

This coupled with the costs of manufacturing the units drove MOMA to investigate other possibilities. By the end of that time, our research showed that we had 4 options:

  1. Concrete Based Solar Light Poles -these requires Cranes anytime these are to be delivered or relocated to or around a site. The costs involved with logistics moving these units are huge.
  2. Steel Based Solar Street Lights, these units are cumbersome, ugly and require cranage to move or relocate to or around a site. They are generally lighter than their concrete counterparts but more expensive yet again.
  3. Trailer Mounted LED Lighting – these require fuel, the lights on these systems are too bright for the same application as our figurative target market’s needs.
  4. Make something New - MOMA to design and manufacture something that was cheaper than concrete, didn’t require ongoing checks each day for fuel or electrical checks and didn’t require craneage to relocate around sites.

 

To be frank, we had a large amount of confidence that we could create something better than what was available. Not only did we want to meet the basic requirements, however, we wanted to create something that would excel in every aspect. Our internal list of requirements ended up being as follows:

  1. No external power. This included running cables between lights or using fuel to power generators.
  2. No CO2 emissions.Reduce the C02 levels we produce by using electricity for existing lighting. We encourage everyone to do our part to help the environment by using Solar Lights.
  3. No noise. One of the constant complaints we heard from users of the generator powered portable lighting solutions was the noise. We wanted to fix that.
  4. No heavy lifting. We wanted to create something that was genuinely portable, and didn’t require the use of cranes.
  5. No special training. We had the objective to create something simple enough that it didn’t require any form of training or licenses to install. Ideal for low-skilled labour.
  6. Weather and Endurance. Australia is where we like to call home. We know just how harsh the weather conditions can get. We wanted to create something that was not only wind resistant, but could also endure the harsh Australian sun for decades outdoors.
  7. The light itself had to be of the highest performance - capable of lighting large areas without sunshine for several days at a time - else the entire concept would prove pointless.

After just a couple of short months we were up and running with prototypes in the showroom and blinding our poor neighbours at night! The rigorous testing on all the different solar lighting kits available on the market proved successful as we were able to source a solar lighting range perfect for our needs and available in a wide array of options.

Only a very short amount of time after that, we were out on a busy Highway setting up our very first unit!

 

Whilst this is only the first iteration of what we hope to establish as an industry changing product, we are genuinely beyond excited to see, hear and experience the world’s response. As always, MOMA needs your help inenhancing the future.

Please don’t hesitate to enquire with us for more information! 

The Original Pop Up Street Light’s specifications can be viewed here.


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